Co-Sleeping With Infants: Science, Public Policy, and Parents Civil Rights, with James McKenna, PhD

Professor James J. McKenna’s Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory studies how sleeping environments reflect and respond to family needs—in particular how they affect mothers, breastfeeding, and infants’ physiological and psychological well-being and development.

Using traditional anthropological and medical research techniques, the laboratory cuts through myths and controversies to provide scholars, parents, and the news media with accurate scientific information on a variety of sleeping arrangements, including safe co-sleeping practices. Included in the articles that are available to download are discussions of what constitutes, from a biological perspective, normal, healthy infant sleep. This perspective offers a major corrective to more traditional infant sleep models promulgated in western societies.

Dr. McKenna's complete vita and select vita are available for review, and parents and health professionals may find particularily helpful video interviews with Dr. McKenna, and powerpoint presentations based on recent lectures both here and abroad. 

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Latest

kidsinthehouse.com

June 25, 2014

You might want to check out kidsinthehouse.com. In addition to my answers to frenquently asked quesitons in my research area there are hundreds of similar questions covering infant and child development addressed by well reputed specialists. To …

Clarifying, Politically Situating, and Amending The USA-based "Safe To Sleep" Campaigns

April 29, 2014

As many parents have written me lately regarding the disresepctful manner so called "safe to sleep" messages are being promoted in various commnities I thought it would be useful to recommend reading two articles, one of which was published with Dr. Lee Gettler,  the other with Drs. Helen Ball and Lane Volpe:

Recent Publications

Night waking among breastfeeding mothers and infants: Conflict, congruence or both?  James J.McKenna

book

New edited volume on human infancy and more optimal developmental settings.

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